Natural Bridge of the Chipola
The natural bridge marked
the head of navigation on the
Chipola River. The bridge is
now part of Florida Caverns
State Park.
The Erwin House
The historic Erwin House in
Greenwood is believed to be
the oldest standing structure
in Jackson County.
Newspaper Accounts of Jackson County, 1820 - 1829
ExploreSouthernHistory.com - Historical Newspaper Accounts of Florida
ExploreSouthernHistory.com - Historical Newspaper Accounts of Florida
These transcriptions were taken from newspaper articles published between 1820
and 1829.


September 6, 1825
East Florida Herald, p. 3.

Chipola. – A county seat for the county of Jackson has been selected on the west
bank of the Chipola river at the head of navigation to be called
Chipola. The lots are
advertised for sale on the first Wednesday after the third Monday in October.

Terms of sale. Ten per cent cash – the balance in six and twelve months.


April 12, 1826
Baltimore
Patriot, p. 2.

PENSACOLA, March 11.

Cotton.- During the last week a considerable quantity of Cotton has come to market.
Among that particularly entitled to notice, were two lots raised on Chipola, and on
Holme’s Valley; these parcels we are informed were of excellent quality, and brought
the highest market price. Sales have been made this week at 10 ½ to 12 cents, and
about nine days since, three bales of first rate, (the same mark as that which
obtained the prize last season) brought 12 ¼ cents.


August 29, 1826
East Florida Herald, p. 2.

We publish, in a subsequent column, a communication from Chipola, signed Civis,
in which much censure to Col. White is implied, in consequence of the selection, by
the Agent of the Kentucky Asylum for teaching the Deaf and Dumb of the township of
land granted by Congress for their benefit, so as to include the improvements of
many of the settlers. We also publish, for the benefit of those who have not seen it,
the Law under which the location is made.

From this act of Congress, it appears, that the land given to the Kentucky asylum,
was to be “located in one of the Territories, under the direction of the Secretary of the
Treasury.” If any error has been committed, it has been by the officer exercising the
controlling power and not by Col. White, who could not possibly, have anticipated, in
which section of the United States the location would be made. With the same
propriety, we might condemn our former delegate for assenting to the location of
Gen. La Fayette’s lands in the vicinity of Tallahasee, which has never been conceived
in the minds of anyone, still our present….


May 2, 1828
The Pensacola
Gazette, p. 2.

New Post Offices – The following new Post Offices, were established in Florida,
during the month of March. Mariana, Jackson County; Mount Vernon, Gadsden
County; and Aspalaga, Jackson County.


Improvement of Florida. – In order to show the progress of our Territory, we give
below a comparative view of the --- amount of postages accruing at some of the
principal Post Offices of Florida, in the years 1826 and 1827 – taken from the
statements of the Post Master General, transmitted to Congress.

Holmes’ Valley,        1826                    .84
   “                   1827                35.91
Webbville                   1826                  7.59
   “                   1827                88.45


August 5, 1828
The Pensacola
Gazette, p. 3.

A letter from Chipola, Florida, dated 16th July says, “lands have risen at least 300 per
cent in price, and are daily advancing – the tide of emigration is flowing in most
rapidly, and the country still proves uninterruptedly healthy; the Physicians to avoid
starvation are removing away: Our crops two or three weeks ago were as fine as I
ever saw; the most gratifying prospects were presented to the planters; since then
however we have had a drought which prevails and produces much alarm; it is a
critical time, for the corn is now in milk. The cane crops are not yet injured; they are
said by persons acquainted with its growth to be as fine as ever seen; indeed
nothing can surpass the luxuriance of their appearance.” –
Milledgeville Recorder.


August 23, 1828
South Carolina
State Gazette and Columbia Advertiser, p. 2.

A letter from Chipola, Florida, dated 18th July, says, “Lands have risen at least 300
per cent in price, and are daily advancing – the trade of emigration is flowing in most
rapidly, and the country still proves uninterruptedly healthy; the Physicians, to avoid
starvation, are moving away. Our crops, two or three weeks ago, were as fine as I
ever saw; the most gratifying prospects were presented to the planters; since then,
however, we have had a drought which still prevails and produces much alarm; it is a
critical time, for the corn is now in milk. The cane crops are not yet injured; they are
said by persons acquainted with its growth to be as fine as were ever seen, indeed
nothing can surpass the luxuriance of their appearance.


August 26, 1828
The Pensacola
Gazette, p. 3.

A new List of the Post Offices in the United States, and Book of Post Office Laws,
Instructions, and Forms, have lately been issued by the Post Master General;
exhibiting the State of Post Offices, on the 1st of June, 1828. By this it appears that
the total number of Post Offices, in operation, at that date was Seven thousand, five
hundred and twenty-three; being an increase of five hundred and twenty within a year.

The following is a list of the Post Offices in Florida.

OFFICES                COUNTIES                DISTRICTS

Aspalaga                  Jackson                       Western
Holmes’ Valley        Washington                Western
Marianna                   Jackson                      Western
Mount Vernon          Gadsden                     Middle
Quincy                       Gadsden                     Middle
Rockhaven               Gadsden                     Middle
Rocky Comfort         Gadsden                     Middle
St. Andrew’s Bay      Washington                Western
Salubrity                    Gadsden                     Middle
Webbville                  Jackson                       Western


April 25, 1829
The Pensacola
Gazette, p. 1.

“An act to organize and regulate the Militia of the Territory.

Be it enacted by the Governor and Legislative Council of the Territory of Florida, That
every able bodied free white male inhabitant of the Territory, between the ages of
eighteen and forty five years, who shall have resided in the same, four weeks, shall
be liable to be enrolled and perform militia duty; excepting, nevertheless, Judges of
the District Courts and their Marshals, Justices of the Peace, Sheriffs, Clerks, Post
Masters, Mail Carriers, Ferrymen, Clergymen, Physicians, Teachers of Public
Seminaries and Schools, and Keepers of Jails, who, in time of peace, are hereby
exempted from militia duty.

Sec. 10. Be it further enacted, That the… the third regiment shall comprise the militia
of the county of Jackson… the fifth regiment shall comprise the militia of the county of
Gadsden… the eighth regiment shall comprise the militia of the counties of Walton
and Washington….

Passed January 18, 1828
Approved January 19, 1828


October 27, 1829
The Pensacola
Gazette, p. 3.

NOTICE
WILL BE SOLD.

At the Court House in Mariana, on the First Tuesday in December next, the following
Negroes, to wit;

Abram, aged 45 years,
Maria, aged 35 years
Louisa, 18 months;
Caty, 13 years, and
Molly 3 years old.

The property James F. Russ (Rosa?) , to satisfy Executions in favor of Thomas
Russ, levied and returned to me by John Holland, Constable.

Sale between the hours prescribed by law.

W.S. Mooring,
Sh’ff Jackson County.
Oct. 15th, 1829.


December 12, 1829
The Pensacola
Gazette

AN ACT
For the relief of John G. Smith and others.

Be it enacted by the Governor and Legislative Council of the Territory of Florida, That
all the contracts, acts and doings, had, done and performed by John G. Smith,
James W. Exum, George Portress, John P. Lockhart, and Joseph Russ, in their
capacities as commissioners to contract for and superintend the building of a court
house for the county of Jackson, and in the town of Marianna, and also a jail on such
lot in the said town as to them should seem fit, and also to locate and enter the
quarter section of land to which the county of Jackson was entitled by an act of
Congress of the United States, and to sell and dispose of the same at public
auction, on the first Monday in January, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight
hundred and twenty-nine, and to apply the funds arising from the sale of lands
towards the erection of the public buildings aforesaid; And all other contracts and
transactions entered into or executed by and in virtue of an act of the Governor and
Legislative Council of the Terriotry of Florida, entitled “an act to establish the seat of
justice for the county of Jackson,” Approved the 23d October, 1828; and annulled by
an act of Congress, entitled “an act to authorize the citizens of the Territories of
Arkansas and Florida to elect their officers, and for other purposes,” Approved 21st
January, 1829: be and the same are hereby made good and valid in law and equity to
all legal intents and purposes as if the said act of the Governor and Legislative
Council had continued in full force and effect.

Sec. 2. Be it further enacted, That the said John G. Smith, James W. Exum, John P.
Lockhart and Joseph Russ, or any three of them, be and they are hereby vested with
full power and authority to ask, demand and receive, sue for and collect all monies
due and owing for, and on account of the sale of said quarter section of land, and all
monies due and owing to their predecessors according to the act of the Governor
and Council before recited, to wit; James Webb. C.C. Nichols, William Patterson,
Arthur Foster and George Jackson, by subscription or otherwise, and the same and
every part thereof to appropriate to the said purpose of erecting and building said
buildings according to the contract or contracts entered into in accordance with the
act before recited, and to make due returns of the disbursements of all monies
collected as aforesaid, to the county court of Jackson county, on or before the first day
of March next, by whom they shall be allowed to retain such compensation for their
services as to the said court shall seem just and reasonable. Which returns as
aforesaid, shall be entered on the records of the said court, and shall be a sufficient
bar to all claims that the county aforesaid, have or may hereafter have against the
said named persons whilst acting as commissioners under the act before recited, or
under this act.

Sec. 3. Be it further enacted, That the Superior and county courts of said county shall
hereafter be holden in the house erected and built as aforesaid; and all other county
or public transactions shall be held and transacted in the same, and all the
prisoners of said county shall hereafter be confined in the house built and erected as
aforesaid.

Sec. 4. Be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of of the commissioners
aforesaid, to deliver the said houses to the sheriff of said county, who shall allow the
marshal and clerk of the Superior courts, and clerk of the county courts; free access
to the said house in which the said courts are to be held, and shall also allow the
said officers rooms in the same for their several offices.

Sec. 5. And be it further enacted, That it shall be the duty of the said clerks of the
Superior and County courts of said county, to hold their offices at the house
aforesaid, in the town of Marianna, or within one mile of the same, and on failure
thereof, be or they shall forfeit and pay the sum of twenty dollars for every week
thereof, to be recovered in the name of the informer, before any justice of the peace
in and for said county, in the same manner as in other cases of debt; one half to be
paid unto the county Treasurer for the use of the county, and the other half to the
informer; and this act shall be in force from and after its passage.
Passed 10th November, 1829.
Copyright 2011 by Dale Cox
All rights reserved.
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