War Eagle Mill and Bridge
Water pours over the mill dam
and flows away beneath the
historic iron bridge.
An Authentic Gristmill
The grindstones of the War
Eagle Mill still turn, turning out
a variety of products.
War Eagle Mill and Bridge - Northwest Arkansas
ExploreSouthernHistory.com - War Eagle Mill and Bridge, Arkansas
ExploreSouthernHistory.com - War Eagle Mill and Bridge, Arkansas
War Eagle Mill
The picturesque water-powered mill on War Eagle
River is a favorite Northwest Arkansas landmark.
Scenic Mill of the Ozarks
A fascinating and nostalgic historic site
nestled in the rolling
Ozark hills of Northwest
Arkansas, War Eagle Mill is one of the most
picturesque places in the Natural State.

The site on War Eagle River has been an
important center of activity since the 1830s.
Sylvanus Blackburn, an early settler and
miller, built the first War Eagle Mill two
decades before the Civil War. It was washed
away by a flood in 1848, but was soon
replaced by a second structure.

The second War Eagle Mill was used to grind
grain to feed the soldiers of both the Union
and Confederate armies during the early
years of the Civil War. Following his
devastating defeat at the
Battle of Pea Ridge
(Elkhorn Tavern), Arkansas, General Earl Van
Dorn marched a portion of his retreating
army past the mill in 1862.

War Eagle Mill was burned during the Civil
War and not replaced until 1873. Brutal
economic conditions in the South prohibited
the rebuilding project for nearly a decade, but
as Northwest Arkansas rebounded from the
devastation of the Civil War, so did War Eagle.

The third mill continued to grind grain for
area residents into the 20th century and was
a focal point of the local community.

Today's War Eagle Mill is a modern
reproduction of the third structure, which no
longer stand. Although it is a 20th Century
construction, the mill provides a fascinating
opportunity to see an authentic water
powered gristmill in operation. In addition, it
is set on the banks of War Eagle River in one
of the most beautiful natural settings in
Arkansas.

When it was completed in 1973, War Eagle
Mill was the first new gristmill built in
Arkansas in nearly one century.

Three stories tall, the mill offers a variety of
exhibits as well as unique shopping and
dining experiences. Visitors can see the mill
in operation, buy wholesome natural whole
grain products manufactured here and even
enjoy lunch or breakfast in the Bean Palace
Restaurant on the third floor. Products from
the mill are also available for order online,
just
click here to visit their online store.

Adjacent to the mill is the historic War Eagle
Bridge, one of the most historic and
charming spans in Arkansas. Visitors can
walk along the wooden flooring of the bridge
and experience scenic views of the mill, pond
and river.
The scenic War Eagle Mill grounds are also
the location for one of the most popular arts
and crafts fairs in the South. For more
information on the dates and times for the
next War Eagle Mill Arts and Craft Fair, just
follow this link.

The fair features one of the largest varieties
of authentic early arts and crafts to be found
anywhere in America and is attended by
visitors from all over the country. Crowds
numbering into the thousands turn out for the
events.

War Eagle Mill and Bridge are located only 12
miles from Rogers, Arkansas and the heart
of the booming Northwest Arkansas
commercial center. It is 25 miles southwest
of
Eureka Springs, but well worth the short
drive. The mill is open to the public seven
days a week for most of the year, but on
weekends only in January and February.
War Eagle in the Civil War
Troops camped at War Eagle
during the retreat from the
Battle of Pea Ridge.
War Eagle Bridge
Recently saved from potential
demolition, the War Eagle
Bridge is one of the most
scenic such spans in the
South.
Gurney's 125 x 125
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Copyright 2011 by Dale Cox
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